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The differences between a Will and Power of Attorney?

The biggest difference between a POA and a Will is their validity period. A Power of Attorney has its effects for while you are alive and is no longer valid after your death, whereas a Will is for after you pass away.

Though they are both legal documents which can appoint other people to manage personal belongings on your behalf, a POA nominates attorneys to help you with financial and legal affairs while a will indicates executors to administer your estates with careful instructions of how they can perform the distribution to beneficiaries upon your death.

Is having a will enough for everything?

It is important to have both an enduring power of attorney and a will.

A will has legal force after your death while A power of attorney is for your financial affairs while you are alive. When you die, your power of attorney (whether general or enduring) ceases automatically.

The differences between a Will and Power of Attorney?
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